What Slicing Methods Do Suppliers of Wooden Veneers Typically Use?

Experts opine that interior design and wooden walls have been around since ancient times. In fact, they have a history that dates back to the times when humans first used wood for building their homes. With the passage of time, the popularity of timberwood panels and other types of wood continued to ebb and flow. At present, wood panelling has come back into vogue. In addition, people have not been using wooden panels in a retro-chic manner either, Rather, they have taken to modern wood panelling that offers a perfect blend of beauty and sophistication. It goes without saying that wooden veneers can do wonders to enhance the visual appeal of any room or space that you put them in. Moreover, veneers offer sufficient levels of versatility too. As a result, you could consider using them in your accent walls or as conventional wallcoverings.

 

When you walk into the facility of any veneer supplier, you might feel overwhelmed by the immense variety of veneers on display. For the uninitiated, veneers refer to extremely thin slices of logs. After slicing the logs, the workers bond these slices to stronger substrates. As a result, veneers often provide superior levels of strength and durability than the original wood they came from. The use of veneers does not only maximise the yield of a log. It also provides an enviable range of textures and looks. A casual glance might make you believe that slicing a log into veneers presents little, if any, difficulty. But, even with the best equipment and machines, workers need to take immense care when slicing logs. After all, the veneer slicing method often exerts a considerable influence on the finished veneer product.

 

Some of the most commonly used methods for producing oak or burl veneers include:

 

  • Plain Slicing: This method involves slicing or sawing across one half of a log. The veneer thus produced will invariably feature an oval or loop grain effect in the centre of the flitch. The edges will exhibit a straighter grain.

 

  • Quarter Cut Slicing: Workers make this cut by slicing the log in a manner perpendicular to the growth rings present in the log. These cuts produce veneers with straight grain appearances. It can be worth mentioning that slicing oaks in quarter cuts could lead to the appearance of flake or a ribbon effect.

 

  • Rift Cut Slicing: The rift cut involves cutting the log at a slight angle to the radial. These cuts produce veneers with straight grain appearances. Moreover, these slices do not produce much flake. Suppliers often find it easy to sequence and match rift cut veneers.

 

  • Rotary Slicing: To peel off a continuous thin sheet of wooden veneer, workers turn the log in a circular motion against the cutting machine. Known as rotary slicing, this method of cutting logs remains the most economical of all when it comes to producing veneers. Rotary slicing produces the maximal yield from the log. But, the grain might be inconsistent with the swirly pattern these veneers have. In addition, the leaves might be difficult to match as well.

It can be worth highlighting that suppliers often grade veneers based on the natural characteristics of the wood. Not surprisingly, the manner of slicing the veneer invariably plays an important part in this process.

For more information, contact us at Forest Products today.

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